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About PLOS Collections

PLOS Collections aggregate and curate related content from PLOS journals and the PLOS Blogs Network to provide structured access to papers of interest in the PLOS corpus and demonstrate innovative approaches to the assessment, organization and reuse of research, data and commentary.

PLOS Collections can be broadly divided into two types:

Archive Collections

Archive Collections dive into the PLOS corpus to curate content on particular topics, such as Synthetic Biology and Immunobiology, and also include the collation of journal series such as PLOS Computational Biology’s “Ten Simple Rules” or PLOS Pathogen’s “Pearls”. Responses to calls for papers are also collated into Collections, such as PLOS Medicine’s and PLOS NTD’s “Blue Marble Health” and PLOS Biology’s “The Promise of Plant Translational Research”. The PLOS Collections Team will consider sponsorship of Archive Collections and Calls for Papers – for more information please contact collections@plos.org.

Archive Collections also include a number of collections on important topics within STM publishing itself, such as “The Missing Pieces: A Collection of Negative, Null and Inconclusive Results”.

Whilst some Archive Collections are initiated by PLOS staff editors, the PLOS Collections Team also welcomes proposals for new Archive Collections. To learn more about proposing an Archive Collection, see Propose a new collection.

Special Collections

Special Collections involve the submission of new papers on a particular topic or by a specific group and are by arrangement only. Papers to be included in a Special Collection are proposed in advance and the project must be agreed by the PLOS Collections Team and the editors of the participating journals. Papers submitted to PLOS for inclusion in a Special Collection undergo the same rigorous peer review as any paper submitted to PLOS.

Some Special Collections concern the outputs of a particular report – such as PLOS Medicine’s “Monitoring Universal Health Coverage” – or the ongoing outputs of a research group or meeting, such as “RosettaCon” or PLOS ONE’s “World Register of Marine Species”.

See Propose a Special Collection for more information about working with PLOS Collections.