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Climate Change Special Issue - Guest Editors

Prof Jonathan Patz

Guest Editor, PLOS Medicine Climate Change and Health

Jonathan Patz, MD, M.P.H. is director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a professor and the John P. Holton Chair in Health and the Environment with appointments in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and the Department of Population Health Sciences. For 15 years, Patz served as a lead author for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (or IPCC)—the organization that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. He also co-chaired the health expert panel of the first U.S. National Assessment on Climate Change, a report mandated by the U.S. Congress, and was Founding President of the International Association for Ecology and Health.

He is double board-­certified, earning medical boards in both Occupational/Environmental Medicine and Family Medicine and received his medical degree from Case Western Reserve University (1987) and his Master of Public Health degree (1992) from Johns Hopkins University.

Competing Interests: None


Dr. Madeleine C. Thomson

Guest Editor, PLOS Medicine Climate Change and Health

Madeleine Thomson is a Senior Research Scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) and Senior Scholar at the Mailman School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences – at Columbia University, New York where she directs the WHO Collaborating Centre (US 430) for Early Warning Systems for Malaria and Other Climate Sensitive Diseases and is the co-director of the Columbia working group on Global Health Security and Diplomacy.  She is also a visiting Professor at Lancaster University in the UK.

Her research is concerned with the development of new data, methodologies and tools for improving climate-sensitive health interventions including the development of climate services for the health sector. Her focus has been on vector-borne diseases (e.g. malaria, onchocerciasis, visceral leishmaniasis etc.) but in recent years has expanded to include air and water-borne infections as well as broader health challenges associated with food security/nutrition and disasters.

She trained originally as a field entomologist and has spent much of her early career engaged in operational research in support of large-scale health interventions, mostly in Africa. She has a BSc. in Animal and Plant Biology (Sheffield 1982) an MSc. in applied pest management from Imperial College London (1985) and a Ph.D. from the University of Liverpool based on her field work on the ecology and identification of the Simulium damnosum vectors of Onchocerciasis Sierra Leone.

Competing Interests: None